A chatbot (also known as a talkbot, chatterbot, Bot, chatterbox, Artificial Conversational Entity) is a computer program which conducts a conversation via auditory or textual methods.

Such programs are often designed to convincingly simulate how a human would behave as a conversational partner, thereby passing the Turing test.

The chatbots based on rules, tend to be limited in functionality, and are as smart as they are programmed to be.

On the other end, chatbots that use artificial intelligence, understands language, not just commands, and continuously gets smarter as it learns from conversations it has with people.

Such apps allow a user to carry on a textual interchange with a simulated chat partner, much as one might chat with a human partner on a date, or through instant messaging or other forms of online chat.

The concept is very similar to chatting with a robot in an internet chatroom or on an internet forum.

Users can chat about various topics, from school homework to song lyrics, or engage in cybersex-style chats.

Malicious chatbots are frequently used to fill chat rooms with spam and advertising, or to entice people into revealing personal information, such as bank account numbers. Messenger, Windows Live Messenger, AOL Instant Messenger and other instant messaging protocols.

by responding to any input that contains the word 'MOTHER' with 'TELL ME MORE ABOUT YOUR FAMILY'). Jabberwacky learns new responses and context based on real-time user interactions, rather than being driven from a static database.

Thus an illusion of understanding is generated, even though the processing involved has been merely superficial. Some more recent chatbots also combine real-time learning with evolutionary algorithms that optimise their ability to communicate based on each conversation held, with one notable example being Kyle, winner of the 2009 Leodis AI Award.

Chatterbots are typically used in dialog systems for various practical purposes including customer service or information acquisition.

Some chatterbots use sophisticated natural language processing systems, but many simpler systems scan for keywords within the input, then pull a reply with the most matching keywords, or the most similar wording pattern, from a database.

machines are made to behave in wondrous ways, often sufficient to dazzle even the most experienced observer.