In the letter to the FCC, an attorney for the rural carriers, Ross Buntrock, wrote to complain that AT&T is refusing to pay the required fees to rural carriersdespite being required by law to do so."AT&T is engaging in very similar conduct to 'reduce its access expenses' by simply refusing to pay its bills," Buntrock wrote.

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Thanks to FCC rules, AT&T is obligated pay these fees to the local phone exchanges to connect the calls, primarily to local numbers in Iowa and South Dakota, but in other rural states as well.

In recent years, volume to these local numbers has increased dramatically, with phone numbers being used by free conference-call companies as well as sex chat lines with names like "Butt Monkey." Ron Laudner, CEO of Farmers Telephone, a local exchange in Riceville, Iowa, last year told the arrangement was routing some 40 million minutes of calls each month to his exchange, generating $2.2 million per month.

AT&T, which has the exclusive right to market Apple's i Phone in the U.

S., which Google Voice will compete against, has argued that Google Voice should also have to connect expensive rural calls.

All of which have a single purpose: to artificially stimulate massive increases in traffic." In other words, AT&T knows this dispute isn't about getting Google Voice to provide service to rural America -- it's about porn.

Naturally, AT&T does not want to pay these exorbitant fees, and yet it's urging the FCC to require Google Voice to connect such calls and pay the fees.

Telephone chat and internet dating have become two of the most popular ways that singles use to connect with each other.

However, one of the two methods is much more convenient than the other when it comes to finding your perfect mate.

AT&T has never been happy about that, and it's now livid that Google Voice can avoid having to connect such calls -- thus dodging this twisted fee scheme.

On Thursday, after much sniping between AT&T and Google, the dispute reached Congress: A group of 20 House Republicans and Democrats wrote to the FCC urging it to investigate Google's right to block calls to rural telephone exchanges.

Despite what a handful of lawmakers may say, the dispute between Google (GOOG) and AT&T (T) over the search giant's Google Voice application is not so much about fairness or rural access as it is about steamy phone sex and piles of money.