The story line of the campaign has a high fashion athletic vibe, as the two models pose as gymnasts at the seaside. Have a look at the pther photos and judge for yourselves!Karl Lagerfeld describes it as "all about athletics and the sea... This show with real live cams and real people and we have no idea what can happened to next moment.

Reall fecam xxx-23

My favorites are the more colorful ones, they feel a lot more fun!

Son of Rodulf / Ranulph de Warenne, I and Béatrice de Vascoeuïl Husband of Hawise de Valois Father of Ralph de Mortimer, Sr de Saint-Victor-en-Caux, Baron of Wigmore Brother of Rudolf / Ranulf ll de Warenne He is believed to have possibly been a brother or close kinsman to Rodolf/Ranulf de Warenne and Guillaume/William de Warenne, 1st Earl of Surrey.

de Warenna" subscribed the undated charter under which William I King of England confirmed the donation by William de Warenne of the church of St Pancras to the monastery of Cluny[224], dated to [1078/81] by the Complete Peerage[225]. "Hadvise et Radulfi filii eius" donated land "in episcopatu Ambianensium apud Mers" to Saint-Victor-en-Caux by undated charter (a copy of which is attached to a late-12th century transcription of a charter under which Hugh de Mortimer confirmed donations to the monastery)[227]. Besides the proof thus afforded of the coheirship of these two brothers in the pays de Caux, we find that Roger, son of Bishop Hugh, sold to the monastery of the Holy Trinity and to the abbot Rainerius the multure of all his men, both free men and husbandmen, living under his rule in Blosseville and Le Mesnil Enard and Neuvillette, and in Lescure and Eauplet, as well as of his own house situate in the city of Rouen, for seven pounds, with the consent of his wife Odain, and their sons William and Hugh.

As her husband is not named in the grant, it is likely that she outlived him. In like manner Ralph de Warren sold for the same sum to the aforesaid abbot the multure of all the men belonging to him in the same villages.

He succeeded his father as Lord of Wigmore, and of other land in Herefordshire and Shropshire. Unde et eidem domino suo Rodulfo, ut hoc annueret, xxx solidos dedimus; quod et fecit ante altare Sanctae Trinitatis. The account of the former writer is put into the discourse, which he attributes to William the Conqueror on his death-bed, in these words; "in time past King Henry (of France) highly incensed against me dispatched a vast army of Franks in two divisions, in order to overwhelm our territories by a double invasion.

Roger was also known as Roger filii Episcopi Mortimer. He himself introduced one phalanx into the diocese of Evreux, in order that he might devastate everything as far as the river Seine, and entrusted another to Odo his brother, and Reginald de Clermont, and to two counts, Ralph de Montdidier and Guy of Ponthieu, that they might quickly enter Normandy by the fords of the Epte, and lay waste Bray and Talou, and the whole of the Roumois, with sword and fire, and from thence continue their ravages, until they reached the sea.

Seigneur de Mortemer-sur-Eaulne, near Neufchâtel-en-Brai, Normandy. The question of the possible co-identity of Roger [I] de Mortemer and Roger, son of the bishop, is discussed in the Introduction to the present chapter.] Roger de Mortemer was related to the Warenne family but the precise relationship has not been determined, as discussed further in the Introduction above.

Orderic Vitalis records that "Roberti Aucensis comiitis et Rogerii de Mortuomari" led the Norman forces ("Caletorum catervam" = troops from the pays de Caux) who defeated Eudes, brother of Henri I King of France ("Odonem fratrem suum") "apud Mortuum-mare" in 1054[220].

Although Roger was later reconciled with the king and recovered some of his lands, the castle of Mortemer remained with the Warenne family.