Acai Berries Acupuncture Artemisinin for cancer Beta-mannan to reverse dysplasia of the cervix Anti-Malignin antibody test for cancer Botanicals for diabetes Bromelain for thyroid disease Cesium Chloride for Cancer Citrus Bergamot for dyslipidemia Clay eating / clay therapy Colonic irrigation for autointoxication Cranberry juice for bladder infections EDTA chelation for atherosclerosis Enzyme therapy for cancer Fucoidin (fucoidan, Limu-Moui) Fulvic acid Gallstone flush Ginger Guaifenesin Herxheimer reaction (Jansch-Herxheimer) HIFU for prostate cancer Ionized Drinking Water Iscador / Mistletoe Lactobacillus acidophilus Leaky Gut Syndrome Live blood cell analysis Manipulative medicine Melatonin No-Dairy diet for breast cancer Oleander soup Plasma generator RECAF antibody test for cancer Relaxin tablets Salivary gland crystallization testing Selenium and Vitamin E for Osgood-Schlatter's Ozone therapy (selected applications) Serratiopeptidase / Serrapeptidase Shark cartilage Silver colloid Sodium bicarbonate for cancer Tea tree oil for acne Tea tree oil for acne Thymic extract Turkey tail mushroom for cancer Ultraviolet blood irradiation Vegan diet to prevent cancer (goes to another page) Venus flytrap extract Vitamin C for atherosclerosis Vitex ("Chasteberry") for premenstrual syndrome Wilson's syndrome Venous angioplasty for multiple sclerosis Yohimbine for erectile / ejaculatory dysfunction Zeolite for cancer This website collects no information.

Here's the ranking system that this site will use: The remedy has a plausable mechanism and has been given some basic tests, and/or has solidly passed two good, clear, controlled studies The remedy makes sense pathophysiologically, and there is at least impressive anecdotal evidence The anecdotal evidence seemed interesting to me, but that's all there was. But if this actually works better than a placebo and a little human kindness, we are all going to have to make some major readjustments in how we think about health and disease. Bold indicates the remedy has passed a controlled, reasonable-sounding study for this use.

Until I see a publication, I'll reserve final judgement. The principal promoter of this complementary remedy is none other than the author of the old "Phantom Notes", which I found very helpful when I was on my surgery rotation.

Like most other pathologists, I take a lot of pride in this. I am an honest physician who engages in public debates.

When I catch somebody deliberately deceiving the public, they never defend their cases on the facts, but almost always call me "arrogant" or "elitist" and claim I am secretly in the pay of the wicked pharmaceutical companies.) And if I screw up even once, I'm in MAJOR trouble.

For starters, the composition of the remedy is not given. ("There is a remarkable phenotypic difference in Type 2 Diabetes.

Second, the authors mention at least three previous studies but do not cite references. The connective importance of the genetic and environment causes of type 2 diabetes varies between people.") These people claim, in their ad, to make pancreatic islands regrow, but there are no tissue studies in the article.As a pathologist, it's my job (among others) to examine tissue, tell what's the matter, and predict the behavior of the disease and response to therapy.Like most other pathologists, I'm extremely successful at this.This site will always be under intensive construction. I cannot buy or read a book, but I am interested in your personal experiences ("anecdotes"), and especially in real work by real scientists (i.e., people taking serious precautions against self-deception.) Unless you specify otherwise, I'll feel free to quote you.I would be remiss without placing links to Quackwatch .(If the fundamental idea is correct, benign cells would be unstained.) I'm ready to draw the obvious conclusion.