And sure, they probably also pick up some kale and gluten-free beer while they’re at it. No where will you find more people with Peter Pan Syndrome than SF. Yes, they may be approaching their 40s, but a lot of SF's daters have no desire to get married, have kids, or do anything their friends in the Midwest did well over a decade ago. Meanwhile girls have decided that leggings, flats, and a messy bun are completely acceptable. Like, borderline might have Asperger’s and/or calls the uniforms in baseball “costumes” and/or has to leave mid-date to fix some code. And, yes, that person will make more money in a month than you do all year.

But then again, why should they since the women in SF seemingly don’t care?

Basically, your date views you like an app that’s in beta.

Okay, maybe when you’re together you’ll actually make eye contact and have real conversation, but there will be no phone calls or emails until months -- years! And might make comments like, “Awww, look at you and your 200 followers. ” And might also never return your texts the next day. So hey: two hundred and No one's getting picked up and dropped off at their house for the “date” and there isn't an implied commitment for dinner.

Because rent in SF is much more affordable when it’s being split two ways.

Maybe you’re pretty great with a lot of promise and the potential to make someone millions, but that doesn’t mean your date wants to actually download you.

And even if they do, it doesn’t mean they’ll ever open you because OOOH SHINY THING OVER THERE.

SF dudes, though, not ALL of them, but a LOT of them, don’t feel the need to pay for the entire date. In theory, this is okay and the girl should probably buy a round or two. It’s not even just dead; it’s been beheaded, burned, and sent out to the ocean on a raft.

The guys in San Francisco, not ALL of them, but a LOT of them, don’t open doors, walk on the proper side of the sidewalk, or stand up when the woman gets up from the table.

She started her online hunt while finishing her master’s degree in business at Stanford and found she was running into the same problem over and over again.

She had no control over who could view her profile, including potential business connections, bosses and coworkers.

That’s the kind of ethos that we want our community to have.” The League has been described as Tinder for the elites.