Visit the IC3's website for more information, including IC3 annual reports.Established by the FBI’s Cyber Division in 2006 to provide rapid incident response on major computer intrusions and cyber-related emergencies, the team has approximately 50 members located in field offices around the country.Ransomware attacks are not only proliferating, they’re becoming more sophisticated.

They are either special agents or computer scientists, and all possess advanced training in computer languages, forensic investigations, and malware analysis. interests abroad, and the team deployed overseas, working through our legal attaché offices and with our international partners.

And since the team's inception, the Bureau has investigated hundreds of cyber crimes, and a number of those cases were deemed of such significance that the rapid response and specialized skills of the Cyber Action Team were required. Members of the team make an initial assessment, and then call in additional experts as needed.

And in newer instances of ransomware, some cyber criminals aren’t using e-mails at all—they can bypass the need for an individual to click on a link by seeding legitimate websites with malicious code, taking advantage of unpatched software on end-user computers.

The FBI doesn’t support paying a ransom in response to a ransomware attack.

This extensive knowledge base has helped CIRFU play a key strategic role in some of the FBI’s most significant cyber cases in the past several years.

Because of the global reach of cyber crime, no single organization, agency, or country can defend against it.

Called the National Cyber-Forensics & Training Alliance (NCFTA), this organization—created in 1997 and based in Pittsburgh—has become an international model for bringing together law enforcement, private industry, and academia to build and share resources, strategic information, and threat intelligence to identify and stop emerging cyber threats and mitigate existing ones.

Since its establishment, the NCFTA has evolved to keep up with the ever-changing cyber crime landscape.

Or the e-mail might contain a legitimate-looking URL, but when a victim clicks on it, they are directed to a website that infects their computer with malicious software.

One the infection is present, the malware begins encrypting files and folders on local drives, any attached drives, backup drives, and potentially other computers on the same network that the victim computer is attached to.

The TTPs usually point to a specific group or person.