I went to a secondary school that was predominantly West African and attended a university that was predominantly white, so my choices were wide and I dated a few of those choices.

Some responses: “Love is love.” Jennifer (23), Angolan “I would only prefer to date a Congolese man because we both understand each others cultures.

The connection is just better because we can relate in many ways since we’ve had a similar upbringing.” Sarah (24), Congolese “I love my Ghanaian brothers, especially those who can speak my tribal language. Especially when telling jokes, it just doesn’t sound the same in English.” Nana (24), Ghanaian “I will be with anyone as long as they are compatible to me and I’m attracted to them. I’m British.” Christopher (28), Nigerian “As long as they are not Jamaican.” Bijoux (28), Congolese “Dating someone from your own background has far more positives than dating someone from another background, such as cultural understanding, speaking the same language etc. I’ve brought a Nigerian, Jamaican and Congolese home.

Love blinds common sense.” “No Nigerian, Ghanaian or Jamaican man is welcome in my house. Why is it better for me to be with a white man than it is to be with a Nigerian? How many marriages do you know of people from two different African countries that have lasted till old age? I pondered those phrases: “It’s for your own good” and “stick to your own”.

Stop wasting your time; you’ll regret it when you get older. It’s for your own good”, said her mother, adamantly.

I can get with someone from Cameroon or Ivory Coast because they speak French but not a Nigerian or a Ghanaian.” I agreed with Alexi.

Being a fluent English speaker who also communicated with her parents in her mother tongue, I tended to slip between languages without thinking about it.

If you can communicate with someone in a language that you both feel comfortable with, it makes being with that person easier.

In Africa, those who speak the same language have a similar culture.

It turns out – whether in Europe or Africa – our “mythical heroes” say more about us and our fears than we would like to admit. ” I overheard a woman I did not know ask in a language I only vaguely understand.

To the woman’s relief, her interlocutor, let’s call her Auntie Ama, responded “No.” “Good, because we do not want her kind here,” the woman said.

” True I didn’t know any mixed elderly couples, but perhaps this is because there is a greater diversity of Africans living in the diaspora than there were 30 years ago.