While the standard security questions are fairly straightforward, if someone knows you well enough, they may be able to guess the answers to your security questions as well.

If a third person is able to figure out your security questions, they can not only reset your password but can also hijack your account.

While it is common sense not to give out your password to anyone, many of us don't think before answering other questions someone might ask us online.

As an adjective, it’s a physical compliment, but as an adverb (as in, “I’m pretty good at sports.”) it’s is just another word.

When used as an adverb it actually does very well (a phenomenon we’ll examine in detail below), but as We took a close look at salutations.

Besides, when you tell a woman she’s beautiful, chances are you’re not.

On the other hand, more general compliments seem to work well: The word is a perfect case study for our point.

The result: a set of rules for what you should and shouldn’t say when introducing yourself. Let’s go: are nice things to say to someone, but no one wants to hear them.

As we all know, people normally like compliments, but when they’re used as pick-up lines, before you’ve even met in person, they inevitably feel…ew.

Scammers and hackers are becoming smarter and they often identify your security questions first following which they strike up a conversation with you online, gradually weaving in the security questions into a normal conversation.

For example, your security question may be about the make of your first car.

Additionally, this could also result in identity theft as the hacker could potential gain access to a variety of personal information from your inbox.

The best thing to do is choose your own security question which should ideally be something only you would know the answer to, therefore making it hard for a hacker to hijack your account.

Read our Password Security Tips if you need help choosing a good password.