I was so connected to my Jewish identity that my betrayal of it was not even statistically probable. I stopped socializing with them in silent protest, after a more outspoken effort had failed.

I self-righteously concluded that we had nothing in common, since they were prepared to give their Jewish identity the backseat.

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I don’t remember making conversation, but apparently I must have mumbled something, since the next morning the host of the party told me that Mr. As I was catching my breath, she casually mentioned, “Oh, I told him you don’t date non-Jews, and he’s fine with that. He really liked you.” This was a delicate situation, to say the least. Then we talked, and laughed, and talked and laughed some more. They should know me well enough to know that I wasn’t going to marry him. Not because we were in a public place, but because they were smart enough to think before they spoke.

Here I was, being pursued by a bona fide heartthrob with absolutely no strings attached. Dinner ended awkwardly, amidst the forlorn clinking of cutlery toying with barely eaten food. I had not seen him shed a tear since his mother passed away, over a decade before.

I am a non-Jewish, who have fallen for a Jewish man, and he had recently told me that he is torn between his faith and continuing seeing me.

We are very compatible, share similar views on several topics, enjoy each other company. I do believe in God, but it is based on my own belief systems comprised of many religions. I could not say at this point if I would convert, but I think I would live with it for the rest of my life always wondering if he resents having to leave his faith to be with someone.

I believe this is the factor that can make the difference. We want our children to care about the meaning of being Jewish.

The factor that needs to be nurtured in our communities: caring. We need to nurture their Jewish identity to the point that it becomes innate.We are a people not because we make choices, but because we are chosen, and because there is the One who made and keeps that choice. The surest way to a happy marriage and beautiful children is to follow the Torah's guidelines. I'm sure everyone that reads is here to learn and understand more about Judaism. As another comment pointed out, even the author describes breaking Mitzvot, but intermarriage is one that is maintained/observed. We have to make our own journey of Tefillah, Teshuvah and Tzedakah. It would have been more understandable had you been their son. In my experience, it is easy to meet non-Jewish people since they outnumber us, Jews being maybe 1% of the population.The Torah is an instructions book on how to maximize the gift of life. For some some women, like me, I choose not to wear pants (dress like a man). I notice you don't talk about being happy from that point on - only duty. What I observed in my experiences, was that I never attracted a non-Jew with whom I had more in common nor admired more than the Jewish ones.Our homes are where we nurture, and where our children learn to care. If you ask anyone that grew up with it, they will tell you the same thing: it’s the simple rituals that have the greatest impact.Our homes are where we show our children what it is important to care about. Lighting Shabbat candles, decorating a sukkah or eating matzah on Passover, putting up mezuzahs on every doorway, laying some Jewish books proudly out on the coffee table, saying Shema Yisrael with our children, hanging out an Israeli flag on Israel’s Independence Day.None of it means anything without commitment to Torah, the sine qua non of Judaism, which happens to explicitly forbid intermarriage (Deuteronomy 7:3).