An example of one of the messages is included below: Subject: Can we talk? However, as with typical advance fee and lottery scams, the messages are simply ruses designed to entice potential victims into making contact with the scammer.I responded to one of these scam emails (using a disposable email address) and received the following reply: From Marina Pretty Hi my new friend Im glad to see that you have decided to reply, I see it is very short letter.The thing is that I will work in your country for three months or so and I would like to meet a nice man to fall in love or just be closest friends.

It is special programm for young people who wants to work abroad and I think it is the right way for me , I am lost here,and I think that I look pretty enough to find a better place .

I want to repeat the same way,it is only my chance to meet a nice man.

So I will have a simple work till I improve my English.

And I can choose any town of your area,agency will only help me to get a visa and all travel documents some suggested placed to work in.

I want to work in USA or in Europe or any nice country.

I am full of plans and different dreams and I want to share my life with good man because I'm also full of love and tenderness, I know that I am not so beautiful like Hollywood Princess but I do hope to meet my Prince and I am sure he will be not be disappoined to meet me in the real life! Well, I will close this letter and I do hope to get your reply.

Quite often, scammers make contact with potential victims via Internet dating services.

However, in other cases, they use a less targeted approach by randomly distributing vast numbers of "bait" emails in the hope of hooking just a few gullible recipients.

Of course, "Marina" has no intention of pursuing a relationship with her victim, nor will she ever come to visit him.