Authors of the new report note that the CDC has changed the way it phrases its questions about teen dating violence, leading more students to report assaults.

Teens who have experienced dating violence are at much higher risk for a variety of serious problems.

If they experience violence in a dating relationship, they might begin to believe that abuse is normal.

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“The relationships may be mostly online or through texts, so the relationships look very different.

They might be in class with that person.” He adds that because these relationships, which could also be same-sex, are usually the students’ first, victims don’t have the experience an adult may have to know the difference between healthy and unhealthy behaviors.

Even if the abuse doesn’t result in a homicide, the trauma from it can affect a young victim’s development.

Dating abuse puts adolescent and young adult victims at a higher risk for substance abuse, eating disorders, risky sexual behavior and domestic violence later on in their lives. high schools lack training or guidelines for counselors in dealing with dating violence, according to a study released by Ball State University last year.

Teens are sometimes more willing to talk to doctors, especially if their parents are not in the room.

Pediatrician Claire Mc Carthy says she talks about healthy relationships with her adolescent patients and asks if sex is consensual, but she says it is hard for doctors to find time to delve into such intimate issues, given that most pediatric appointments last only 15 minutes.

This point is particularly noteworthy since breakups are the times in violent relationships when abuse most often escalates or becomes lethal.

Educating students on healthy relationships and breakups, however, can help, as can guidance for students on how to interpret the messages being targeted at youth and young adults from the media.

"They need to feel safe telling a parent."Teens often hide the abuse from their parents, Spinks-Franklin says.