For example, after the Hyksos rulers were expelled from Egypt, the Egyptians erased the records of that humiliating period so thoroughly that some of the names and the order of the Hyksos kings remain uncertain.

Some time later Pharaoh Thutmosis III destroyed virtually all records relating to Queen Hatshepsut, the previous ruler, whom he despised.

Therefore it is essential that our evaluation of the evidence be accurate and fair.

First, let’s make sure we have a clear picture of the Biblical perspective.

ran a front-page story reporting that a liberal rabbi in the Los Angeles area caused quite a stir when he shocked his congregation by stating he had his doubts that the Exodus ever took place.

“The truth is,” explained Rabbi David Wolpe,that virtually every modern archaeologist who has investigated the story of the Exodus, with very few exceptions, agrees that the way the Bible describes the Exodus is not the way it happened, if it happened at all (Watanabe 2001).

We should not be surprised, then, that some critics have focused so much attention on this fundamental event in the Bible.

They try to discredit the story of the Exodus to undermine its historical validity.

Perhaps you have read such articles and wondered whether you can believe the Bible.

After almost 200 years of archaeological research in Egypt and Israel, why do so many challenge the Exodus account?

Archaeology is, in fact, a limited and imperfect area of study in which the interpretation of findings, as archaeologists readily admit, is more of an art than a hard science.