Complete survey results, online safety tools and tips, and links to NCMEC and other resources are at com A very interesting survey with some eye opening results that parents should consider when kids are left unsupervised on the Internet. Some teenagers will not think twice about posting their address, phone number and picture online. The study shows that some teens do not care about their future. The research also shows that too many teenagers considered meeting someone face to face that they met on the Internet.

They do not understand that it is almost impossible to get incriminating information or pictures off the Internet once they are there. Another too many teens actually have met face to face with someone they have met online.

The level of parental involvement is higher for younger teens and girls, although it has increased across all age groups and both genders.

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While 16% of teens say they have considered meeting face-to-face with someone they’ve talked to only online, that marks a significant drop compared to the 30% of teens who were considering such a meeting.

8% of teens say they actually have met in person with someone from the Internet, down from 14% in from the previous year.

This year, 25% of teens say their parents know “little” or “nothing” about what they do online, down from 33% last year.

41% of teens report their parents talk to them “a lot” about Internet safety (up five points over 2006), and three out of four say their parents have talked to them in the past year about the potential dangers of posting personal info.

With some of the information and pictures I have found on Facebook, they should be concerned.) Most hiring managers and HR departments use search engines to research applicants?

Men and women Google each other when they first begin dating?A recent study from the American Psychological Association found some interesting results regarding the statistics of Internet predators and today's youth.They found that the majority of Internet predators do not pose as children as the prior conception of the Internet predator stereotype was perceived.That is when a teen sends nude or semi nude pictures of themselves and sends them to other people with their cell phone. However, many teens remain unconcerned about the risks of sharing personal info on the Internet and nearly two-thirds post photos or videos of themselves on social networks like Facebook and Friendster.The findings are from the third annual survey Cox and NCMEC have fielded to help parents realize the potential dangers of the Internet.Of course, the children do not tell their parents whom they are chatting with so how are parents supposed know who their kids are chatting with on the Internet.