These algorithms can probably pick up some key things – for example, it’s true we’re more likely to be friends with people with the same values as us, who share our cultural milieu.

Cash-rich, time-poor professionals who already do everything from shop to socialise online, now see a search engine as the obvious gateway to love.

Scarred by their parents’ (or their own) divorces, this generation approaches affairs of the heart with the same pragmatism as it might buying a car or booking a holiday.

“I only wish I’d signed up years earlier, then Mark and I might have met sooner.

Nobody’s perfect, but for me, he’s as close as it comes.” Follow Telegraph World News on Twitter The Big Short, the film adaptation of Michael Lewis' book of the same name about the causes of the financial crisis, opens in UK cinemas this weekend.

I’d always been attracted to mavericks, handsome men, who – after a year or so – made it clear they had no intention of settling down.

“Although I felt a bit of a loser, I joined an online dating agency.But in the 20th century this all changed, with young people deciding they wanted to be in charge of their own domestic destinies.Matchmakers were viewed as hook-nosed crones from Fiddler on the Roof or pushy Mrs Bennet at the Pemberley ball.From Romeo and Juliet, to dashing Mr Rochester choosing plain Jane Eyre, we celebrated stories of Cupid’s dart striking randomly.But since 1995 when the first online dating site was launched, the tables have completely turned.One in five relationships in the UK starts online, according to recent surveys, and almost half of all British singles have searched for love on the internet.