The event became the catalyst for a major public perspective of gay and lesbian Liverpool and shortly followed was 'Our Story Liverpool', an oral history resource which recorded the experiences of community members from the 1930s to the present day.

In June 2008, Liverpool City Council launched a Public consultation on the partial pedestrianisation of streets in the gay quarter, with a view to enhancing the night time leisure experience of the area.

The legacy of Victorian laws and homosexual criminalisation meant that the city's lesbian and gay community would be largely underground for the next century and little is known about it during this period.

However, recent research has highlighted the existence of an unofficial gay quarter around Queen Square from as early as the 1940s, which earned itself the nickname "Covent Garden of the North".

A major project titled 'Tales From Yester-Queer' organised in conjunction with The Armistead Project, Unity Theatre and Liverpool Record Office, became the first ever attempt to pay tribute to the experiences of older lesbian and gay Liverpudlians.

The project involved collecting and collating various spoken, written and video sources, as well as a short film commission 'Gayzin Liverpool', produced by local filmmaker Sandi Hughes.

A consultation on Feria Urbanism's draft report titled "Stanley Street: Strategic direction for a vital urban quarter (May 2011)" has taken place.

Suggestions for which organisations and stakeholders should take responsibility for proposed actions and recommendations have also been made, and it is envisaged that initial stages of regeneration should take place over the next 2–5 years, with a longer term vision.

Whilst in the past research into this area has been limited and scarce, interest has grown considerably in recent times.

In his 2011 lecture 'Policing Sex Between Men: 1850-1971', historian Jeff Evans examined 70,000 criminal records dating back to 1850 and was able to shed light on hundreds of records of men prosecuted under the Criminal Law Amendment Act 1885 (the law used to prosecute Oscar Wilde) found in the court papers of Liverpool and North West England.

Cllr Nick Small, cabinet member for employment and skills, said: "We have made strides in recent years and are being seen as a more gay-friendly city than was the case a few years ago.

We now need to look at how we can develop and promote the quarter." As a result of this report in 2011, numerous regeneration options for the Stanley Street quarter were under discussion and include new rainbow coloured paving, artworks, gateway features, street-tree planting, new outdoor seating and street furniture, and a new public square.

Initial plans to revamp Liverpool's gay quarter were unveiled in February 2011 after detailed consultation with the public and stakeholders.