Many of these national organizations can guide you to more in-depth and knowledgeable resources in your community and surrounding areas.These hotlines offer support from well trained, caring advocates 24/7/365 (including holidays).Several different words are used to describe teen dating violence. Dating violence is widespread with serious long-term and short-term effects. Unhealthy, abusive, or violent relationships can have severe consequences and short- and long-term negative effects on a developing teen.

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A 2011 CDC nationwide survey found that 23% of females and 14% of males who ever experienced rape, physical violence, or stalking by an intimate partner, first experienced some form of partner violence between 11 and 17 years of age. Teens receive messages about how to behave in relationships from peers, adults in their lives, and the media. Risks of having unhealthy relationships increase for teens who — Dating violence can be prevented when teens, families, organizations, and communities work together to implement effective prevention strategies.

The 2013 national Youth Risk Behavior Survey found approximately 10% of high school students reported physical victimization and 10% reported sexual victimization from a dating partner in the 12 months* before they were surveyed. All too often these examples suggest that violence in a relationship is normal, but violence is never acceptable.

The National Indigenous Women’s Resource Center There is a national network of specialized resource centers that work to address domestic violence responses across these specific systems: 1.

Unhealthy relationships can start early and last a lifetime.

It can be hard to know where to go for the help you want and it may not be clear how these programs can support your efforts to live a life free of violence and abuse—but you are not alone!

The resources listed below are great places to start your journey towards safety, hope and healing.Services may vary from place to place, but most include: All of the service providers listed above—the hotlines, shelters, state coalitions, and tribal programs—work together and receive training, assistance, guidance, and support from several national resource center and culturally specific institutes.These organizations make up the Domestic Violence Resource Network (DVRN), which is funded by the U. Department of Health and Human Services to inform and strengthen domestic violence intervention and prevention efforts at the individual, community, and societal levels.Advocates help victims and survivors of domestic violence and rape or sexual violence find support and assistance in their communities, even if you only need someone to talk to before making that first step.By calling any of the national hotlines, a trained advocate will be able to connect you to a program in your community.Select your state from the list and then look for the link to their members or programs for a listing of the resources in your city or county.