They're interested in black coaches and black quarterbacks doing well.

I think what we've had here is a little social concern in the NFL.

I think the media has been very desirous that a black quarterback do well.

In December 1990, journalist Lewis Grossberger wrote in The New York Times that Limbaugh had "more listeners than any other talk show host" and described Limbaugh's style as "bouncing between earnest lecturer and political vaudevillian." Limbaugh's rising popularity coincided with the Persian Gulf War, and his support for the war effort and his relentless ridicule of peace activists.

The program gained more popularity and was moved to stations with larger audiences, eventually being broadcast on over 650 radio stations nationwide.

In 1972, he became a Top 40 music disc jockey on WIXZ, a small AM radio station that reached much of the Pittsburgh area.

He started with an afternoon show and later did mornings, broadcasting under the name Jeff Christie.

Daniel Henninger wrote, in a Wall Street Journal editorial, "Ronald Reagan tore down this wall (the Fairness Doctrine) in 1987 ...

and Rush Limbaugh was the first man to proclaim himself liberated from the East Germany of liberal media domination." On August 1, 1988, after achieving success in Sacramento and drawing the attention of former ABC Radio President Edward Mc Laughlin, Limbaugh moved to New York City and began his national radio show.

Then I had this big light strand on a tennis court with a message [spelled out] to her that you could see looking down from the balcony of our 18th-floor penthouse. She keeps me inspired, and she complements me very well.